6 Common Tourist Scams & Rip-Offs in Morocco

Many locals in Morocco are honest and very helpful to travelers, however there's a minority who are focused on ripping people off.

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Snake charmers, carpet sellers right out of central casting, artisans who are more like con artists – they're waiting for the unprepared tourist. Don't be one of them.

1. Henna Ladies

If you're getting a henna tattoo, make it clear exactly what you want, and where you want it on your hand. The henna ladies have a habit of very quickly extending their designs up your arm and demanding payment for the extra work.

Even if you haven't actually requested a tattoo, don't stand too close, or have your back to them – particularly in theJemma el-Fnna in Marrakech – you may find unwanted henna appearing up your arm, and of course a request for payment.

The henna ladies also offer a small design sample for free. Some assume that it might be good for business if other tourists see you getting henna or walking around with a small pretty design - a loss leader - so they accept the free sample. Even with careful upfront explanations like “I have no money with me”, the henna ladies, of course, demand payment. If you don’t pay, they will take a cloth and smear the henna all over your hand which is extremely messy until it dries, and you’ll likely get it on your clothes. When looking at their “menu” note that the listed prices are ridiculous and if you really want a design, you can negotiate.

Avoid avoid avoid the henna ladies! Most hotels will arrange a henna artist or recommend a place for you to go with fair prices and quality henna.

2. Pay Per View Photos

Taking photos of snake charmers, dancers, monkey keepers and water sellers will require a payment. Take a few coins whenever you go looking for a photo opportunity.

Perversely, in the Jemma el-Fnna the water sellers get annoyed if you don't take their photo, it can be unpleasant or annoying, but never reaches menacing proportions.

3. Unwanted Assistants and Guides

You'll be approached by hundreds of Moroccan men asking to be your guide or assistant. Same with any other friendly strangers around the world, there's often a price to pay. These "guides" can be very persistent and intimidating – particularly in Tangier, Fes, Marrakech and Essouaria.

It's a scam. You know it's a scam, they know you know it's a scam – so they come up with more subtle ways of making themselves your guide.

Scenario 1:

You're taking a photo and find yourself approached by someone who can show you a better viewpoint. As you snap your photos and take their advice, they're suddenly leading you all over the medina, until finally, they request money for the "service" they've just provided you.

Scenario 2:

You ask directions to a place, or a market to buy something, and you're led on a wild goose chase through the souk for an hour, and then asked to pay for their guiding services. This wouldn't be so bad if they hadn't taken you to the usual tourist haunts (the ones you would have found on your own) or to the over-priced shop where they get a commission for delivering you.

Scenario 3:

You're approached by someone wanting to practise their English, which leads them to show you around the souks and medina, where you'll have tea and they'll tell you about life in Morocco. Until finally, they demand money for the service and become very persistent when you don't pay.

How to Avoid These Unwanted Assistants

  • If you need directions, go into a shop. The owner can't leave the store, so won't have any interest in leading you astray. Or ask a family for directions.
  • If you find you've inadvertently acquired an ad hoc guide, or you're being harassed by someone who insists on being your guide, ask him to take you to the tourist police. It's illegal to be a guide without a registered licence.
  • If you really want a guide, get one of the official ones – ask your hotel for contact details.

4. Kif, Hash and Drug Laws in Morocco

Don't buy drugs in Morocco. Hard to believe, but true: the authorities take a hard line against drug use. But, of course, some take advantage of this.

One of the most common scams is for a dealer to claim, "it is safe, no problem!" and sell you a large amount of "kif" (two layers of pot with tobacco between in a pipe).

The hapless tourist is arrested, either because the dealer was an undercover policeman, or because the police gave the dealer a payment for the tip-off – or they were all in the scam together. The only loser is the tourist who will most probably end up in a very unpleasant Moroccan jail.

In Chefchaouen (the blue city), the propositions to buy drugs are even more prevalent, given the numerous cannabis plantations in the region.

5. Don't Have the Rug Pulled From Under You

Scenario 1: Tea Time

Morocco has hundreds of carpet shops, and as you walk by, you'll no doubt be invited in to "just look" and try some tea.

While this isn't a scam, it certainly preys on a sense of obligation to pay from westerners. Not a bad deal though, 1 cent for a cup of tea, just to try and secure a big sale.

If the carpet seller becomes demanding, offer to pay for the tea, which will release you from your obligation to buy an expensive carpet.

Scenario 2: Greedy Tourists

This carpet scam preys on your greed. You meet another foreigner who's in Morocco to buy carpets, and sell them back home – at a handsome profit.

He'll invite you to dinner with his local guide, and then the following morning you're taken on a tour of the souks and craft shops – where you inevitably end up in the carpet shop.

You'll see your new friend selecting a few carpets and you'll overhear the price.

The carpet sellers start showing you the rugs and carpets and will offer you a lower price! Can you believe your good luck?

If you pay the amount asked, you've been scammed at a hugely inflated price, as all your new friends are in this deal together.

It's also very unlikely that you'll be able to resell the carpet for a higher price back home, despite their advice.

6. Bargain Hunting for Moroccan Carpets and More

Don't let the scams put you off, there are some lovely items to be found in Morocco – but do some research!

Know what the carpets cost back home. Then, in the souk, look around and get an idea on prices.

If you're feeling pressured to buy, just say you need to get your friend for a second opinion before committing to a purchase, or when you return to the city after your tour in the Atlas Mountains you'll make the decision.

It'll take a lot of willpower to resist the well-practiced selling techniques, and some great haggling skills to get a good price – but that's all part of the adventure.

26 Comments

  • Kelly said

    Here are some other tips I would like to pass along during a recent trip to Morocco. Let it be known that I have been to Morocco many times in the past and have seen some elaborate schemes and some that are downright laughable. Unfortunately during this last trip, a friend of mine from Senegal was discriminated against despite the fact that he is Muslim and speaks Arabic, French and 7 other languages.

    1. Do not believe the taxi drivers in Marrakesh. The fare from the airport to the medina should not be more than 50 dirham. My friend who arrived days after I did, paid 200 dirham for a 2.5 mile ride. I later told him to take the airport bus when he was departing for his return flight to France. It is only 30 or 40 dirham.

    2. Boycott Hotel Amira et Vacances in the Marakesh medina (27 USD) due to their blatant racism toward my Sengelese friend. They told him he had to leave when I left despite the fact that he paid his bill. Their breakfast is not good either and the coffee was funky when they served my friend. The tea they served me was not drinkable and I refused it.

    3. Beware of the fish stalls in Essaouira. The fish was just so so and we were charged over 55 USD for two mediocre meals with lukewarm fries. They claimed they could not give us fresh fries because they were cooked elsewhere. They even had the nerve to ask for a tip! We refused. Ask someone to show u where the locals eat.

    4. Dont give money to the many beggars u will encounter. Many of them are scammers. One so called blind boy who had a helper was able to discern quite well where my hand was that held the money. This was at the bus stop in Marrakesh and I gave him bus fare of 3.5 dirham...just for the heck of it.

    5. Keep track of what u order from the food stalls in Marrakesh. At stall number 1 that was heralded in some travel mag according to their sign, they tried to rip my friend and I off for twice as much money. When I called them on the bill, they changed the price. They had added all kinds of things we had not ordered. The next night, the woman asked me why we did not want to eat with them again and I boldly told her it was because she tried to cheat us the nite before. She quickly left us alone after that.

    6. Be aware that even if u pay for a window seat on a CTM bus, there is no guarantee u will have that seat. An old woman stole my seat, refused to move thereby forced me to sit in someone else's seat. He complained about me and the driver made me sit way in the back. It was very uncomfortable. I complained but nothing was done! I was furious because it was a long bus ride and that took the pleasure out of the ride.

    7. Please patronize the Sengelese who are trading their wares. They are discriminated against and have even fewer rights than Moroccans themselves. In fact, they have NO RIGHTS at all because they are illegal and hounded by the police who throw them in jail or steal their wares.

    8. Know that Moroccan police are corrupt and many Moroccan vendors are greedy and deceitful. They will cheat you out of a measly dirham.

    9. Be aware that you do not have to pay to use the bathroom in public places so dont give in to Moroccans who watch as u exit the bathroom and hold out their hands. I fell for this once but only to the tune of one dirham, roughly 13 cents!

    10. Bargain for all things. In Rabat and Fez, you can buy watches with designer logos but look carefully as some may fall apart as soon as u put it on. This happened to me on my recent trip March 2013 and I took it back to the vendor to have it fixed. The band fell apart again as soon as I got home but the watch itself (made in China with the Chanel logo) works beautifully. I only paid 30 dirham or less than 4 dollars for it.

    11. Don't believe these ppl who claim to be students and only want to practice their English. I called them on it and told them I was not interested in purchasing anything from any store. They left me alone.

    12. In Fez, dont let the so called guides to the tannery or medina tell you there is an entrance fee. I told the young man that I had been there before and there was no entrance fee to the tannery. He left and I laughed. I guess conning ppl is good work if u can find it.

    13. Beware of foreigners who lead you to hotels. I met this British or Australian man who encouraged me to stay at Pension Talaa in Fez's medina. He was standing in front of it and claimed it was a great place to stay. It was a 14 USD dump with no sink, tv, shower or toilet in room. I hated it and moved out the next day to medina Hotel Bab Boujloud which was way nicer. I only stayed at Pension Talaa because it was raining very hard and I was tired from the long bus ride from Marakesh. DO NOT STAY THERE under any circumstances.

    14. Be aware that animals are not treated with kindness or respect in Morocco. I saw the poor monkeys and donkeys being terribly mistreated. It broke my heart. Morocco has millions of cats and they are not treated much better and look like they could use some vet care with their runny noses and sick looking eyes. It is terrible.

    15. If you do meet and talk with a Moroccan, try not to engage in political or religious discussions. Some vendors asked if I was a Muslim, I truthfully told them no and that I am a Christian. They called me a "Nazrani". I guess they thought I did not understand and then they jacked their price on goods. I refused to pay.

    16. Some Moroccans will tell you they dont dislike Americans only our government, but they are lying because in America we the ppl ARE the government, so don't think they really like u. They are after something either money, a visa or whatever they feel they can con you out of.

    17. If they ask you if you like the president of the USA always say yes even if you dont. Do not bad mouth America or Islam, even if you dont like either one.

    18. Enjoy Morocco. Eat well and travel safely.
    Hope this helps.

  • Mark said

    While on a tour with Peregrine I went to a carpet shop in, I believe Midelt-Merzouga. I bargained pretty hard and purchased a nice rug and because I was aware of a scam where they swap a poorer quality rug for the one you purchase, I was very particular about keeping an eye on the rug. For only a few seconds the owner was very insistent in keeping me occupied, no matter how I said no to another rug and tried to follow my rug to the wrapping room. Well you can guess what has happened; I have gotten it home only to find the ends ratty and worn and even a slight tear in the rug. At one stage I was even tempted to make them unwrap my rug again just to make sure and now regrettably I should have.
    Buyer beware.

  • Gareth Williams said

    wow sounds like you have a real problem with moroccans

  • Canadian said

    #14. The cats are strays. The animals should be treated kindly, but the Moroccans don't have enough money to pay for exhorbitant vet bills (and neither do many North Americans!).

  • Nadine said

    In my opinion Morocco is not worth the trip or the effort. It's been overly romanticised. I thought it was going to be amazing BUT most of my experience was having the locals working to scam every step I took from blankets to buying a simple orange juice. They tell you one price for the orange juice and then demand double after you drink it. The same thing that happend to Mark with a rug - happened to me with two berber blankets in Fes. I opened them at home and found acrylic. (Also, being from NYC- I felt as though the Old Fes Medina is equivilent to Times Square in NYC for tourists. If Marrakech is worse - which is hard to even imagine - you are better off staying home or choosing another destination).
    Morocco is not really all that beautiful considering with every step you see starving kittens, abused donkeys, abused women & children and the stink of human/animal waste.
    Before going I asked many people about it and most told me of the beauty of Morocco. Maybe I am missing something here, but I really had a hard time getting past the overwhelming poverty, smell, scam artists and just plain gross.
    Spain was beautiful. Morocco was gross. Moroc-gross.
    Read the post above...do you really want to spend your vacation stepping over starving kittens while the people there try and rip you off every step of the way?
    Fes was supposed to be the less touristic destination - it felt to me like the tourist scam capital of the world. The old medina portion that is safe for tourists which is where the locals purposely keep tourist in one area of the medina - where they can offer you the world- rip you off on the price and leave you holding nothing but cheap junk that smells like a donkey.
    I believe there is a rich and amazing culture in Morocco somewhere under the feces...but I will NOT be going back to even try to experience this.

  • lari said

    The word Mazrani is not anything derogative, it is a word to refer to people with crhtistian background. While many things are true people often get paranoid thinking that people hate you because of your backgound, it takes a lot to know people's psicology.

  • David ad Rob said

    I agree with all these posted comments and have never experience anything quite like Morocco! Laying on my bed in Tangier patiently waiting to get to Spain where life works normally! What gets me is the hospitality of hotels! You can here them yell and scream, slam doors from your room! The begging and blatant shopping rip offs eventually jade you to the point you lose interest and after being in five cities it's all absolutely the same stuff even though they all say they made it! Sade from bad manners from the Bedoins I really enjoyed our camel ride and night in the Sahara but nearly went head over heals off the croatching camel as I was asking for advice how to get down! If coming to Morroc have a back up plan if your sensitive and know it's not like home! No one hear has your concern just your wallet! From Canada

  • latiefaomar said

    I recently went on a trip to Morocco. We stayed with a family who was warm and generous in every way. We had an experience with them that we will always treasure. Our holiday day was only for a week and the family we stayed with took us to Fes,Rabat and casablanca. Lots of things said above comments are true but my spin is that it might not be on the scale of Morocco as you do find that some areas all over the world have slum areas so do be careful of all above. Crime is everywhere so go to countries in a group , I can`t say you wont have an incident as a group but its more safer in numbers. My stay was wonderful as the family was very near us all the time They actually never let us out of their sight. At first I thought this was a bit of a red flag for me as I usually shop on my own and meet whoever`s with me at a certain time and place. We could not understand their language.Also we were taking a lot of pics on our cellphone very openly and found on many occasions that some people were saying things to us regarding us showing our cellphones. They seem to be warning us with cross gestures but went on doing this with no understanding at all. We would soon get into huge trouble that scared the hell out me My husband and I went for a walk just to check out the neighbourhood where were living. While walking my husband made a movie on his cellphone not knowing that we were watched the entire time! To cut to the chase we walked a short distance to where a mosque was. My husband sat a little and then we decided were going back. The next thing a man with a knife as big as butcher knife was weilding it in front me.I was so scared I was crying and saying no to him the next he went to my husband and cornering him towards the wall. I was terrified to see my husband in this horrible situation. My husband screamed while he lunged forward with his knife. I unintentionally distracted him by lifting up my bag which he crabbed because he was looking for our cellphone. He ran away with my bag. I took my husbands hand and ran like I never ran at 53 years old. I just could not stop crying because I really thought he was going to stab us. Apparently while we were experiencing this lots of motorists stopped and one of them retrieved my bag .Lucky for me I always empty my bag which had valueable documents ,a camera and money. My purse had 70 rand and 50 dirhams which he took .Our cellphone was still in my husbands pocket!!!! Although we went through this I still maintain that there are down to earth and good people. I biggest mistake was we were warned but could not understand what they were saying and that there is crime.So don`t go walk alone without someone knowing where your going because if that man killed us nobody would have found us as there was a field nearby where my husband actually saw him going down before the incident.

  • Joao Luis said

    I went on a 10 day organised group trip with the wife and a 10 and 6 year old. I loved everything about it. Walked around evry medina with my kids and wasn't harrassed that much, maybe because we dressed simple and said LA to pretty much everything they had to offer. Even when I got scammed I liked it. 10 MAD for them is way more than 1 euro to me. Isn't paying 5 euros for a bad coffee in Norway a much bigger scam? There are a lot of poor people in this country with no pensions or subsidies so tourists are a possible income.
    Will be returning this month on my own adn do a car trip around the country to explore the smaller towns off the beaten track but with a decent road (like Imlil, Essaouira, El Jadida, Tetouan, Chefchaouen, Volubilis).

  • martin wykes said

    a so called official guide gave an interesting tour around the berber market in marrakech. Imploring us he was an official guide and paid by nthe tourist board we naively listened to his spiel and ended up in a carpet warehouse the owner of witch although elderly informed his workers to display several carpets none of which had price tags although the guide told us everything had an official price because berbers are not swinderlers got away with losing 700 dirham that day. Warning he stands by the main mineret and is a total.

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  • Bob said

    The thing about morroco is that you have to be prepared for the hustling and ridiculousness in what they 'll try. A guy gave me the 'unintended' tour and then wanted 25 euros.I'm easy so I paid him but if you have more money anywhere visible when you pay they 'll ask for that too.it just gets so tiring to the point you have to just feel like a big target. One guy helped me and wanted money and I said no so he starts yelling that I'm a bad man.I was so tried after more than 2weeks of constant harassment that I said 'I am a bad man!' And he took off quick.they say the police are just looking for opts to take advantage of situations where tourists complain,but that seems like the tourist could maybe get pressured somehow too into somehow having to pay off pllice.it's like you never have a clue what to believe,the guy at a hotel seemed sympathetic but next thing I'm somehow at his friends shop trying to be sold a leather money belt for 50 euros.telling them I'd overpaid everywhere else was like an invitation to rip me off.now I just laugh but it's really sad.I guess those guys don't make anything really but what they can get out of you.they make 250 Euro a month so when I told them I d been duped into spending 100 Euro on some creams for the spa at the tourist price, it's a lot of money for them.they felt so bad for me that they would give me the money belt 'at no profit' for 50 euros.like i said,by then i just laugh cause you see its all to try get their share so I just leave then and just get cold.but it's really an eye opener on things cause I've been to a lot of places but here seems really outlandish.makes me sad that money gets in the way of brotherhood.now I'm just wary to talk to anyone here or ready for confrontation when I get pressured.usually they just make some noise and you leave,haven't had any real problems ,but is just so annoying .I need a vacation from my vacation.

  • Judy said

    I was interested in going but won't be going because I don't want to be hassled......... and I hate to shop.

  • Kate said

    @Nadine: If you were impressed by Spain and not by Morocco that might just mean you like Western world traveling. In no way can you compare Spain to Morocco, of course. Spain is part of the European Union, which means it's at the same level of civilization and cultures as most of the US is (or at a higher level, quite frankly). Morocco is a third world country.

    I was surprised by how well I was able to manage traveling in Morocco. I normally change the tv channel if I see as much as an animal on tv (especially cows, seals or whales) because that normally means some sad story about slaughtering or cruelty is coming up. I saw cats that live on the streets but I saw Moroccans put boxes outside for the cats to sleep in and I saw them pet them.

    Yes, the pressure to buy stuff is annoying but if you have a guide (they only cost 15-25-50 dollars) you will be left alone by others. I walked into several shops to try on leather jackets and everything for an hour and I still walked out with nothing. In my opinion the Americans just don't want to be rude or something and that's why they buy. Forget about being rude. Just set a price in your head and stick with it.

  • christina borris said

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  • Mohammed I. Q. said

    I am victim of sextortion blackmailer from Agadir morocco. I was in panic & sent him money thru western union when he promised swearing by god that he will remove my private video if I sent money. but unfortunately he sent me text message last week to send only dh 1000 more for his mother funeral otherwise he threatened to post video on youtube. I repented to Allah for my stupid mistake but am in agony afraid of unknown. can somebody help me please in the name of God & humanity. I have the blackmailer name and 2 mobile numbers. I also have a mtcn number of western union money transfer. Thank you in advance

  • john said

    I am in morocco now. I was just taken advantage of in marrakech even though I know about moroccan rugs. Be careful if you go into these government fixed price places such as Ensemble Artisinal Twizra. They will claim they are a coop and produce a ledger type book that shows what the makers of the carpet want it is a scam. They go to places like taznakht and pay women pennies on the dollar and bring them back to marrakesh and rip tourist off. I am in taznakht now and you can buy carpets for probably one fifth the price in marrakech. Rent a car and drive there to buy a carpet if you dont want to be ripped off. Offer them half of what they ask and they will be happy.

  • mara sedan said

    you dont have to travel to morocco to be scammed, just on facebook alone i have encountered many romance scammers from morocco, pledging their love and wanting to marry me and come to live in my country, they cant get visas so they want the woman to travel to them and marry them...i was totally shocked by this form of scam, so to all single women on fb regardless of age , please be aware of this romance scam from men from morocco and other third world african countries

  • kimberly said


    Mi novio era muy tranquilo y parecía enfadado hacia mí cuando regresó de la oficina Parecía mal humor y no se preocupan por la cena, incluso canceló nuestros planes debido a la enorme presión de los miembros de su familia. Después de tomar alguna engañosa asesora de algunos de los miembros de su familia. Hemos estado saliendo durante más de 3 años y la planificación de nuestro futuro juntos. Dijo que es más, cuando le pregunté qué le pasaba, estaba muy enfadado y me quería fuera de su vista. Un buen amigo mío que sabe acerca de nuestro separamos presentarme a una máquina de colada amor hechizo que le ayudó con un hechizo que trajo de vuelta a su novia. Pensé que la idea de un hechizo de amor era extraño, pero estaba dispuesto a darle una oportunidad. Cuando entré en contacto con el Dr. Ezomo por primera vez que estaba asustado, pero él me aseguró que sólo usa la magia blanca que es seguro y no tiene efectos secundarios. Me sentí un poco mejor y decidí hacer el hechizo amante de retorno. Dentro de 4 días después de que el hechizo se lanza se presentó en mi oficina, dijo que me echaba de menos y quiere que estemos juntos de nuevo. Estoy muy feliz y quiero decir un gran agradecimiento a la Dra Ezomo por su trabajo maravilloso Estamos de nuevo juntos y nuestra relación ha sido mejor la segunda vez. Puede ponerse en contacto a través de su dirección de correo electrónico: drezomospellhome@hotmail.com o ponerse en contacto con él a través de WhatsApp 2349055406117 o ponerse en contacto conmigo; edwardkimberly24@gmail.com para obtener más información sobre Ezomo dr,.

  • Nadeem Inayat said

    First of all, Morocco is a beautiful place and you will keep in your hearts memories of this place forever but like all places there are few things that people have mentioned here that are worthy of commenting on so let me give you my take on a few of them: -

    1. Poor people and scams. Most people asking you for money are not scammers, especially the elderly. Please bear this in mind and find in your hearts to give 10 or 20 dirhams to them. It equates to 1 or 2 euros which is something most of would deem insignificant but is enough to buy a meal for a family. Giving a kid 1 or 5 dirhams for a packet of tissues is nothing for you. Do it with a smile. I promise you will feel good about yourselves if you give money to the poor.

    2. Valuation of goods: Make a valuation of the price of the goods you wish to purchase from souk vendors in your head and stick to it. If you are aren't able to negotiate a price you consider fair, you are perfectly entitled to walk away.

    That being said, please bear in mind that many shop owners in the souks will quote you a fair price which they think is reasonable based on what you would pay in the malls/markets where you live, i.e. First World Countries. If, however you have fixated on a price which is well below what you would normally pay at home, you are taking advantage of the traders poverty and hoping he/she will settle on a 'cheap' price because they are more in need of the money than you are. For me this kind of attitude from Westerners is yet another form of oppression akin to colonialism that Moroccans have suffered greatly under. Don't be that person.

    Go deep into the heart of the souks and see with your own eyes the craftsmanship of the metalwork, leatherwork, carpentry, the skills on display in relation to herbal medicine, the artistry of those weaving rugs and host of other things and you will see people hard at work, who are masters of their craft, of skills that have been handed down generations from master to apprentice. Don't insult them by offering them cheap prices for their wares. Pay what you feel is a fair price taking into consideration your own financial means and what you would pay for something similar at home, possibly in the sale or something, but if you genuinely feel that the vendor is quoting you a price which is way off what you would pay at home, then say La or Khalaas and walk away.

    3. Cameras and taking photos. Take pictures with your eyes and capture the memories in your heart. Imagine if you were back home and you had strangers appearing in your lands taking pictures of your house and of you just because they found you quaint or your habits amusing. Please bear in mind that you are not in zoo and treat others with the same dignity like you would like to be treated yourself.

    4. Security. People are decent in Morocco and the government has gone to great lengths to increase the military presence on the streets where the new malls shopping areas are located as those place attract a lot of tourists. You will see one policeman and two armed military guards on duty. It is a very safe place.

  • HollyStay said

    Great solutions to those scams which are very common in Marrakech. However, I think there are few more scams to add to this list:

    1- Airport transfers:
    You need to book your airport transfer few days before you travel, you will have enough time to compare rates as they change from agency to another, some of them charge almost twice the market price, also, this will you avoid long waiting at the airport.

    2- Taxis:
    Some taxi drivers may charge you a lot more than what they could charge a Moroccan. To avoid this, the country established a price table as follow:

    #Departure from airport:
    -Jamaa el Fna: 50 Dhs
    -Av. Mohamed 6: 50 Dhs
    -Guéliz: 60 Dhs
    -Semlalia: 65 Dhs
    -Golf Palace: 80 Dhs
    -Complexe Ali Bel Fallah: 120 Dhs
    You don't have to wright them down as all taxis have a sticker pasted in top right corner of the windshield(Small and sometimes invisible but take your time to check the enforced rates before paying the driver).

    3-Currency exchange:
    Do not exchange your currency anywhere as the exchange rate is very fluctuant from store to store. Be sure to check 3 to 5 different banks and exchange agencies before choosing the one you will be using every time you need Dirhams. This tip can be very helpful as you could save few hundreds of dirhams next door, who knows!!



    4-Inviting Moroccan girls to your holiday rental:
    It's knows that a considerable number of travelers unfortunately come to Marrakech for sexual reasons called "Sexual tourism". Morocco is a Muslim country and having Moroccan females at your rented villa or holiday rental is totally illegal, both of you could be arrested by Moroccan authorities.

    5-Casinos in Marrakech:
    Do not intend to go through a Roulette table with your credit card or a large amount of cash as they intend to manipulate the results more than any other casinos around the world. Because gambling is prohibited in Morocco, Marrakech casinos can sometimes play around and this will cost you a fortune, trust me! (I've seen people losing more than €100.000 in one night but never ever the same amounts in winnings which is a bit weird ;) )
    PS: As you are traveling, try to enjoy your vacation and go for all possible activities and tours (hundreds of tours, excursions and activities are offered by agencies and tourism specialists each and every day) rather than giving away your money to someone that doesn't deserve it (Casino!).

    Marrakech is a very beautiful city and deserves to be visited. Some people felt so in love with the Red City that they restarted their lives in it.

  • Ithatso said

    Khalid you are the same now with your comments. Does that feel good? Being the same as the people you critise?

  • Nathan said

    If you are gonna be a cat best be a cat in Essaouiera. Some of them are fatter cats than the tourists! If you are just a fat cat tourist realise that you are also a cow, a cash cow. I cannot say for certain that this is 100% correct but on all the available evidence to me, it is. I have a friend in Casablanca who I never got to visit, she told me that I just went to the wrong places and I need to hang out with her friends. I am willing to believe this as I saw many well dressed Moroccans commuting to presumably better paid jobs.

  • Caz said

    I spent 3 weeks travelling around Morocco and yes it's a crazy place but pretty amazing, its such a diverse country.
    You have to prepare yourself for the madness of Marrakesh, you can say no and walk away, it may feel rude but it's acceptable to do there.
    My friend & I were fortunate as we couchsurf which is a fabulous website that unites travellers, we stayed with a lovely lad in Marrakesh who was invaluable & showed such hospitality which a lot of Moroccans Do, there not all out to get you honest. Our other hosts in ouarzazate, essaouira, merzouga, Todra, imsouane, Toubkal mountain refuge were wonderful people.
    Try not to be aggressive in your manner as it will likely be returned.
    The coast is much more laid back.
    I'd definitely return
    . Be respectful
    . Be aware
    . Be confident
    . Be Friendly
    . Be understanding of the culture
    . Say no and walk away if need be
    . You can ignore sellers if they call after you it's ok if you don't want to be bothered
    Just have an awesome amazing experience

  • Abdeljabbar-EL said

    For sure no one can deny that, in every place you visit, there would and always be a certain kind of useless,ignorant... people who only look for money , like if they were raised on money, its a mist be aware of them. Yet we know that there are good people also , who can offer help and hosting without paying to them. The common ideas or stereotypes are that if someone approches you means he or she wants money, be careful cause sometimes you missunderstand and judge directly.
    for any help contact me on astar2126@gmail.com
    see you.

  • Babar said

    Will someone comment on scams made by Morrocan women seeking marriage with foreigners, telling stories and you ended up sending them money. The marriage websites are full of Morrocon women as if they are all desperate to leave Morrocco.

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