A natural disaster waiting to happen in The Democratic Republic of Congo

Not only do you have to watch out for the people who live there, volcanoes and earthquakes also love to keep travellers on their toes.

So prepare yourself and keep an eye on the news to see what the current situation is, as many towns are built on the slopes of volcanoes.

Volcanic Issues

Volcanic eruptions don't happen daily, but they do happen every few years.

Nyamulagira is Africa's most active volcano, so keep an eye on what it is doing.

The reason tourists may get caught up here is the wildlife that exists on the slopes of these mountains. Due to the abundant jungle which grows in volcanic regions, some of the Congo's famous primates also inhabit these regions. This draws tourists into the areas.

When it comes to Nyiragongo volcano, tours have begun taking intrepid souls up the slopes for a visit.

This may seem a good idea, but just be wary. Make sure tour operators are going to take care of your well-being.

Flowing lava adds another element to the sort of danger you'll face in the Congo.

The DRC is subject to constant earthquakes.

An earthquake hit the towns of Bukavu and Goma in February 2008. Many people were injured and property was damaged.

It probably isn't going to worry too many people, except the guarantee that most accommodation in the Congo isn't earthquake-proof.

While the DRC has its consistent political and social upheavals, the country's environment is also in constant upheaval.
Not only do you have to watch out for the people who live there, volcanoes and earthquakes also love to keep travellers on their toes.
So prepare yourself and keep an eye on the news to see what the current situation is, as many towns are built on the slopes of volcanoes.

Earthquakes

The DRC is subject to constant earthquakes.
An earthquake hit the towns of Bukavu and Goma in February 2008. Many people were injured and property was damaged.
This probably isn't going to worry too many people, except the guarantee that most accommodation in the Congo isn't earthquake-proof.
But quakes in the Congo shouldn't be scoffed at, most tremors can shake the whole of East Africa. The last big one in 2008 saw tremor reports in Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda and Tanzania.

Other Concerns

While volcanoes and earthquakes are the main natural disasters to watch out for, there are some more common problems that you should be wary of.
The rainy season is April to October in the north and November to March in the south. Landslides and flooding may occur during these periods, which can affect transport infrastructure.
Landslides are common, so watch out for areas that have received a lot of rain. This may be hard to do but it is a normal concern for most travellers.
The DRC also straddles the Equator, with one-third to the North and two-thirds to the South. As a result of this equatorial location, the Congo experiences large amounts of precipitation and has the highest frequency of thunderstorms in the world.
This may seem a concern, but it's a heads-up in a country known for things to go very wrong.
Information on natural disasters can be obtained from the Humanitarian Early Warning Service.
But in the event of an earthquake, volcanic activity or other natural disaster, follow the advice of local authorities.

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1 Comment

  • phoongdan said

    But Luis, will he arrive before or after Santa Claus and the Easter Bunny? That's the real question!

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